Professional Development

Facet #1: Integrity

*Disclaimer: The account you are about to read should in no way reflect upon my former fellow teachers. The fact that they remain where they are despite knowing the truth of what I will describe should not be taken to mean that they tolerate or approve of the issues. Compassion should be extended to them as they endure factors that require them to remain, when they wish they could join me in departing. Finally, I attempted to reconcile with the parties at fault, but to no avail. I only record here a general account of the issues and will not name names or specifics.*

I have struggled a great deal as to what, if anything, should be said about the chief reason I departed my teaching career. A great battle has been waged in my mind because I fear that in revealing the nature of the most pressing facet, I will in turn cause injury to innocent parties. My most ardent wish is that the issues I faced be seen for what they are and that those who are co-laborers under such realities will be given compassion, understanding, and grace. The challenges of the system do not always lie with teachers, but most often with those who rule over the system. Continue reading

Categories: Character, Education, Educational Therapy, Learning, Philosophy, Professional Development, Simple Living, Teaching Craft | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Update Time!

IMG_1144Good Day to you!

It has been some time since I last wrote on this blog; mainly because I have been running another blog about theology and did not think I would be returning to this blog.

Yet, as it stands, I am now in my third year of teaching at Summit Christian Academy with the change this year that I will be working with gifted students. At SCA, we use a pull-out program called Stewards. Here these students work together to cover extracurricular units that hone their skills and teach them responsible use of their gifts. This year, these gifted students will cover unique units running the gamut of Conservation, Culinary Arts, Architecture, and Aerodynamics to Body Systems, Inventions, and World Travel.

That is where this blog comes in.

There is one particular section of our study this year that will provide a lot of hands on experience, challenges, and opportunities for my students. Currently, the project has the enthusiastic approval of the administration as well as the local City Hall. Lord willing, I will know tomorrow if all of the funding is in place and whether we can begin the project. Accordingly, look for an update soon as I reveal what exactly this project is!

If/When the project is underway, I and my students will post regular updates (complete with photos). I hope you will follow our progress and encourage my students in this journey.

From the Desk,

Mr. Bluebaugh

Categories: Cultivate, Education, Professional Development, SCA, Stewards, Teaching Craft | Leave a comment

NILD Level II Accomplished!

NILD Level 2Well, the week has come to an end and I have successfully completed both the online course work and residency training for level two of educational therapy! (With a final score of 94%) The last month has been non-stop work since I returned from vacation June 1. (This probably explains why June vanished…)

This past week of residency training has been incredible. Generally, I really struggle with online course work since the in-class interaction with teacher and peers is absent; I thrive on immediate interaction and being able to hone ideas with my peers. Accordingly, a week of residency training (5 days, 8:30a-4:30p) is essential for me to solidify the new knowledge I gained during the course work. Further, I find learning and growing in community to be invigorating and rejuvenating. (Something much-needed after my overloaded first year.) Finally, I found that gathering with my peers this week proved beneficial in growing my understanding of how to be more empathetic with students. I am sure we all rubbed off on each other and will benefit from our collective experience for years to come.

Therefore, I am so thankful to the Lord for placing me in a field that is consistently stimulating intellectually and involves frequent problem solving as I study student’s tests and determine which techniques will best stimulate the deficits. Further, I am thankful for such a dynamic instructor for the course and partner in the field; Tony has been with NILD almost longer than I have been alive. He is zealous for the cause of NILD, 100% convinced of the efficacy of the techniques we use, effective in his instruction, and encouraging in his critique of growing therapists. Finally, I cannot imagine taking the class with a better group of people; we had interacted over the course of the 4-week online work, but really clicked when we gathered together this week. These ladies brought so much life to the course and imparted to me their years of experience and working with students; I can’t wait to meet back up at conferences.

I walk away from this course holding many memories (the “I like you mouse“, and the “panic button”), equipped with new techniques, encouraged in my field, further skilled in previous techniques, and ready to take on the new year of school.

Recharged and writing from the desk,

Mr. Bluebaugh

P.S. – You may be asking, “What is NILD Educational Therapy?” I will answer that question on Monday! Stay tuned.

Categories: Educational Therapy, MA Work, NILD, Professional Development, Teaching Craft | Tags: , | 2 Comments

Professionalism in Educational Therapy

Professionalism Requires GrowthProfessionalism weighs heavy upon me in the midst of anything I do. This attitude was instilled in me by my father who has been a top-notch salesman for over 20 years; often standing within the top 5 sales persons in his company from year to year. Further, professionalism has been in my recent deliberations concerning my career due to a recent survey I embarked upon regarding the doctrine of vocation (perhaps summed up best by Martin Luther when he said: God does not need your works, your neighbor does). Since I have been placed in the field of educational therapy, I am to glorify God in every aspect; one of those aspects involves professionalism and integrity.

It is important for Christians to practice with integrity and professionalism in the midst of a world, especially in special education, that looks down on Christians. However, if Christians are to practice with integrity there must be goals and plans in place for it to occur; professionalism does not occur overnight. Further, I believe that in order to maintain a professional practice, you must always be learning from colleagues and adapting your practice to ensure best practice methods. Professional practice requires ardent work, self-sacrifice, and faithful application of conviction and practice. Accordingly, when reflecting upon my own practice, there are two areas I wish to work on in the coming year in an effort to improve my professional practice.

First, I must be empathetic. I am not naturally empathetic when it comes to educational expectations. I frequently battle the temptation to chalk up a student’s shortcomings to conscious and willful laziness or a failure to apply one’s self adequately (though this does happen from time to time). When reading the chapter entitled “Empathic Intelligence” from The Clinical Practice of Educational Therapy, I was convicted of the role empathy is to play in our educational practice. Though there was much I learned this year regarding empathy and the practice thereof, there is still much I could do: daily practice patience when frustration is evident, continue to provide a safe, encouraging, and personable environment for therapy, and go out of my way to provide positive feedback and encouragement in progress throughout the year.

Second, I resolve to zealously learn my students. My students are made in the image of God and inhabit more than figures on a page; it is imperative that this never leave the forefront of my mind in my practice. As I learned this past year, interaction with my students extends beyond the therapy walls. Moving forward, it is my earnest goal to learn the academic desires, wishes, passions, ambitions, temperaments, study practices, and family dynamics of my students in order to fully accommodates their needs in a manner that involves them and is not merely about them.

What about you? Do you have thoughts regarding professionalism in your vocation? Share them in the comments below and let us begin a dialogue!

From the Desk,

Mr. Bluebaugh

Categories: Education, Learning, Philosophy, Professional Development, Teaching Craft | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

1st Year Recap

Betonwerksteinskulptur "Lehrer-Student&qu...

Betonwerksteinskulptur “Lehrer-Student” von Reinhard Schmidt in Rostock (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Well my first year of teaching and working in Special Education has come to an end and I want to summarize my experience in the ring. Currently, I am writing a mere 100 yards from the ocean in Salvo, NC as my vacation comes to an end; I cannot image a better way to conclude a great first year. As I have been away and relaxing, I have been mulling over my experience in an effort to elucidate the lessons I am to learn and apply to make next year even better.

The last month of the school year was hectic and full of uncertainty for where I would be in 3 months time. The end of the year is always marked by a mad dash to summarize reports, grade final projects, finish course material, and complete the necessary in-service days before the end of the school year. This makes for a rapid end that flies by in such a manner that one could easily overlook all the lessons one is to take from the year. When one is glad that the race has ended and a time of repose has begun, the last thing on the summer list is to learn from the success and failures of the previous year.

Here are the top six things I can gather from my experiences and put forth for you and I to learn from.

  1. The power of saying NO and the power of saying YES. There were many things I should have said NO to this year. However, in my desire to be the best coworker I could be, there were a lot of things I said YES to and the result was a schedule gorged with work and starving for leisure. I should have listened earlier in the year to my former 5th & 6th grade teacher (now coworker) when she explained why I needed to be careful what I took on to prevent burnout. Though I did not burn out, there were times I was very close. (As the year progressed, I did learn to be comfortable saying NO) That being said, there is also great value in saying YES. There were times when I would fill in during a spare hour to fill the gap for a teacher with an emergency or a sub who was running late. Being flexible and being able to fill in the gap aids in creating a mutual environment of support and care; I will always help my coworkers to the best of my capabilities and opportunities.
  2. When dealing with students who are more literal than normal (i.e. does not understand metaphors, colloquialisms, etc.), choose your words very carefully. If you do not, you will be misinterpreted, parents will be upset, meetings will follow, and you get the picture.
  3. Avoid the temptation of taking work home with you. I did this way too much at the beginning of the year. While I am single and do not have pets and taking work home is not as much of an issue now, it is certainly not a habit I want to establish before I am married and have a family of my own. I learned that I would be most productive with certain tasks at the beginning of the day as opposed to putting them off to the end of the day. Accordingly, it was easier for me to arrive early to work (6-6:30 range) rather than to stay after school; after a day of intense individual Discovery Therapy, one does not have much energy left.
  4. Relationship enforces discipline. I found that it was futile to issue discipline if I did not have  a relationship or rapport with the student. Without the common ground, discipline is viewed as capricious and as though the teacher has it out for the student, instead of being an instance where the teacher can help form students and aid them in understanding correct conduct. This manifest itself most evidently in my duty as cafeteria monitor for the high school. Since only 1% of the high school actually had me as a teacher, the only context the other 99% of the students knew me was in the cafeteria as the guy who made them clean up. Accordingly, meaningful discipline was near impossible. I am still trying to determine how that scenario can be remedied.
  5. Keeping track of communication is key in education. A log of when parents are emailed and why is a life saver sometimes. It also allows you to determine if you are communicating too much or not enough.
  6. Something that worked well this year was to include my boss on every important email; I learned this trick from my father. Though not every email would require any action on her part, it allowed her to keep a pulse on what was going on in the department and how parents/students were being handled. Further, if a situation were to come up, she already knew about the previous track of communication and was not blindsided. This is one practice that will stay in my quiver.

From the desk,

Mr. Bluebaugh

 

Categories: Education, Learning, Professional Development, Teaching Craft | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

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