Monthly Archives: June 2013

NILD Level II Accomplished!

NILD Level 2Well, the week has come to an end and I have successfully completed both the online course work and residency training for level two of educational therapy! (With a final score of 94%) The last month has been non-stop work since I returned from vacation June 1. (This probably explains why June vanished…)

This past week of residency training has been incredible. Generally, I really struggle with online course work since the in-class interaction with teacher and peers is absent; I thrive on immediate interaction and being able to hone ideas with my peers. Accordingly, a week of residency training (5 days, 8:30a-4:30p) is essential for me to solidify the new knowledge I gained during the course work. Further, I find learning and growing in community to be invigorating and rejuvenating. (Something much-needed after my overloaded first year.) Finally, I found that gathering with my peers this week proved beneficial in growing my understanding of how to be more empathetic with students. I am sure we all rubbed off on each other and will benefit from our collective experience for years to come.

Therefore, I am so thankful to the Lord for placing me in a field that is consistently stimulating intellectually and involves frequent problem solving as I study student’s tests and determine which techniques will best stimulate the deficits. Further, I am thankful for such a dynamic instructor for the course and partner in the field; Tony has been with NILD almost longer than I have been alive. He is zealous for the cause of NILD, 100% convinced of the efficacy of the techniques we use, effective in his instruction, and encouraging in his critique of growing therapists. Finally, I cannot imagine taking the class with a better group of people; we had interacted over the course of the 4-week online work, but really clicked when we gathered together this week. These ladies brought so much life to the course and imparted to me their years of experience and working with students; I can’t wait to meet back up at conferences.

I walk away from this course holding many memories (the “I like you mouse“, and the “panic button”), equipped with new techniques, encouraged in my field, further skilled in previous techniques, and ready to take on the new year of school.

Recharged and writing from the desk,

Mr. Bluebaugh

P.S. – You may be asking, “What is NILD Educational Therapy?” I will answer that question on Monday! Stay tuned.

Categories: Educational Therapy, MA Work, NILD, Professional Development, Teaching Craft | Tags: , | 2 Comments

Professionalism in Educational Therapy

Professionalism Requires GrowthProfessionalism weighs heavy upon me in the midst of anything I do. This attitude was instilled in me by my father who has been a top-notch salesman for over 20 years; often standing within the top 5 sales persons in his company from year to year. Further, professionalism has been in my recent deliberations concerning my career due to a recent survey I embarked upon regarding the doctrine of vocation (perhaps summed up best by Martin Luther when he said: God does not need your works, your neighbor does). Since I have been placed in the field of educational therapy, I am to glorify God in every aspect; one of those aspects involves professionalism and integrity.

It is important for Christians to practice with integrity and professionalism in the midst of a world, especially in special education, that looks down on Christians. However, if Christians are to practice with integrity there must be goals and plans in place for it to occur; professionalism does not occur overnight. Further, I believe that in order to maintain a professional practice, you must always be learning from colleagues and adapting your practice to ensure best practice methods. Professional practice requires ardent work, self-sacrifice, and faithful application of conviction and practice. Accordingly, when reflecting upon my own practice, there are two areas I wish to work on in the coming year in an effort to improve my professional practice.

First, I must be empathetic. I am not naturally empathetic when it comes to educational expectations. I frequently battle the temptation to chalk up a student’s shortcomings to conscious and willful laziness or a failure to apply one’s self adequately (though this does happen from time to time). When reading the chapter entitled “Empathic Intelligence” from The Clinical Practice of Educational Therapy, I was convicted of the role empathy is to play in our educational practice. Though there was much I learned this year regarding empathy and the practice thereof, there is still much I could do: daily practice patience when frustration is evident, continue to provide a safe, encouraging, and personable environment for therapy, and go out of my way to provide positive feedback and encouragement in progress throughout the year.

Second, I resolve to zealously learn my students. My students are made in the image of God and inhabit more than figures on a page; it is imperative that this never leave the forefront of my mind in my practice. As I learned this past year, interaction with my students extends beyond the therapy walls. Moving forward, it is my earnest goal to learn the academic desires, wishes, passions, ambitions, temperaments, study practices, and family dynamics of my students in order to fully accommodates their needs in a manner that involves them and is not merely about them.

What about you? Do you have thoughts regarding professionalism in your vocation? Share them in the comments below and let us begin a dialogue!

From the Desk,

Mr. Bluebaugh

Categories: Education, Learning, Philosophy, Professional Development, Teaching Craft | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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